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LINKAGE Camden Study

11 April 2017

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Delirium is a medical term used to describe a change in brain function which makes a person become suddenly confused. Their behaviour and concentration may also be affected. It can make people feel frightened, restless and suspicious. The symptoms can come on quickly and change from hour to hour. It is very common, particularly among […]

Spatial Navigation in Pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease

15 February 2017

Getting lost is one of the most common and distressing symptoms for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients and their families, often involving the police and in tragic cases resulting in death. However, the underlying reasons why patients are getting lost are virtually unknown. One reason for this limited knowledge, is that it is not clear how […]

What can best predict the decline of memory and thinking?

10 February 2017

The CHARIOT-PRO team

Identifying opportunities for the right kind of effective intervention to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease is important. The CHARIOT-PRO study is therefore looking to investigate what tests of cognition, memory, thinking, problem solving and everyday functions, together with certain biological factors, best predict the decline of memory and thinking abilities. The study’s co-ordinator, Dr Natalia […]

Drug Free Table Tennis Alzheimer’s Therapy

16 November 2016

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There is a strong belief among many people that table tennis activity can have mental, physical, and social benefits to those living with Alzheimer’s; from the likes of improved concentration through the focus of playing, increased upper body strength through the movement of playing, and a feeling of happiness through the fun of playing. We […]

Understanding cognition and action in Pick’s disease

28 October 2016

Professor James Rowe, Chief Investigator on this study

Pick’s disease also known as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a type of dementia. Dementia prevents some areas of the brain ‘speaking with’ other parts of the brain, much like damaging telephone cables or the internet. This is not only due to physical damage to the brain, but also due to the loss of critical chemicals […]

Super Smellers study

10 October 2016

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This study is investigating whether Parkinson’s disease can be diagnosed as a result of changes in the skin. It is looking for healthy volunteers who may be able to take part via Join Dementia Research. Through outreach activities in the Parkinson’s disease community, a woman has been identified who claims to be able to detect […]

Preliminary evaluation of Lithium as a GSK-3 inhibitor in MCI

12 September 2016

MRi brain scan image

Lithium is a naturally occurring element and is present in very low levels in our environment including our drinking water. As a medicine it has been used for many years as a highly effective treatment for disorders of mood but more recently it has been found to exert some effects which may be beneficial to […]

The ‘EARLY’ Study

16 August 2016

Dr Stephen Pearson, Chief Investigator for the EARLY Study (UK branch)

Introduction by Dr Pearson on The ‘EARLY’ Study Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes increasing damage to the nerves in the brain with symptoms, referred to as cognitive decline, such as difficulty making decisions, memory loss, and behavioural problems such as anxiety. Specific protein fragments (Amyloid-beta), which are sometimes linked with nerve […]

The ENGAGE study

19 July 2016

Professor Craig Ritchie

The latest clinical trial to be added to Join Dementia Research is ENGAGE, from Biogen Inc. Part of an international study, it is looking to determine whether a new medication called Aducanumab, can slow progression of early Alzheimer’s disease, as well as investigating whether it’s safe to use in patients. Researchers are looking for volunteers […]

The DARet Study

11 July 2016

Hanna Isotalus, Study Coordinator for the DARet Study

Sometimes patients treated for Parkinson’s disease can have problems with memory and learning. This is thought to be due to a decrease in their dopamine levels due to their disease. Dopamine is a naturally occurring chemical in the brain. Patients with Parkinson’s disease are given many drugs to increase their dopamine levels back to normal, […]

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