Archives

Spatial Navigation in Pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s Disease

15 February 2017

Getting lost is one of the most common and distressing symptoms for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients and their families, often involving the police and in tragic cases resulting in death. However, the underlying reasons why patients are getting lost are virtually unknown. One reason for this limited knowledge, is that it is not clear how […]

Language, Communication & Alzheimer’s Disease

31 October 2016

Vineeta Chand, Chief Investigator on this study

Given increasing public awareness and concern about Alzheimer’s Disease, this project seeks to expand public understanding of dementia-based language and communicative changes through research and public engagement. We caught up with Vineeta Chand, Chief Investigator for this study, to find out more: What are the main aims of the study? Our research focus is on […]

Understanding cognition and action in Pick’s disease

28 October 2016

Professor James Rowe, Chief Investigator on this study

Pick’s disease also known as frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a type of dementia. Dementia prevents some areas of the brain ‘speaking with’ other parts of the brain, much like damaging telephone cables or the internet. This is not only due to physical damage to the brain, but also due to the loss of critical chemicals […]

The TASKED Study

15 September 2016

Professor Eneida Mioshi, Chief Investigator for the TASKED Study

As well as causing memory problems, dementia can make it hard for people to carry out everyday tasks. This affects quality of life for both the patient and their family carer, as well as being expensive for the NHS and social services. The difficulties people with dementia have with daily tasks are partly to do […]

CRN Eastern Research Nurse MADE the grade

22 July 2016

l-r: Research Nurse, Louise McCarthy with Phil and Sue

This story was originally featured on the NIHR CRN website. The Minocycline in Alzheimer’s Disease Efficacy Study (MADE) is a multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial in very mild Alzheimer’s Disease. It aims to determine whether an antibiotic called Minocycline is effective in reducing the rate of cognitive decline over a 2-year period and to assess the safety […]

Promoting Independence in Dementia

14 April 2016

Professor Martin Orrell

The Promoting Independence in Dementia (PRIDE) study is looking to find out how to best enable people to maintain their independence in the early stages of dementia. The study is made up of several projects looking to help people with dementia, and their family and friends, to live a fulfilling life. One of the first projects is […]

The ‘PROTECT’ Study

26 February 2016

‘PROTECT’ is a new dementia research study being run by the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London that is recruiting through ‘Join dementia research’. How does it work? The aim of the study is to improve understanding of the way our brains age, and why some people develop dementia, in order to develop better […]

The ‘IDEAL’ Study

Aims of the Study IDEAL is the first large-scale project of its kind, and what the researchers find out will be used to guide policy and practice for helping people deal with dementia. As we get older we experience various changes in memory and other abilities which can affect our well-being and quality of life. […]

Looking at the relationship between memory disorders and inflammation of the brain

9 September 2015

Professor John O'Brien

The Neuroimaging of Inflammation in MemoRy and Other Disorders (NIMROD) study is looking at the relationship between memory disorders and inflammation of the brain. Recent technical developments allow the use of brain imaging methods (Positron Emission Tomography or PET scans) together with marked chemicals to visualise sites of inflammation. Other forms of PET imaging can also […]

Investigating technology for screening populations who are ‘at risk’ of developing Alzheimer’s

30 July 2015

Sally Jennings, researcher on the EEG study

Down’s Syndrome is a genetic condition that is usually associated with some degree of intellectual disability. People with Down’s Syndrome also age prematurely and are at very high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Around half of people with Down’s Syndrome have Alzheimer’s disease by the age of fifty. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a technology that records […]

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